Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 (2003)

Tchaikovsky

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Daniele Gatti

Time has tamed Tchaikovsky. Works that once must surely have seemed radical–‘bold’ is a word that won’t do–are conventional to contemporary ears, and the sensibility that inspired Tchaikovsky at his most impassioned has over the past hundred-plus years been diluted. His intensely private drama, which he made public most notably in his final three symphonies, has been obscured by successive waves of culture and commerce that, from Tchaikovsky’s day to ours, have inured us to an exceptional odyssey of passion and pain. 
Tchaikovsky remains a conundrum. There is the master dramatist whose finest operas, Eugene Onegin and The Queen of Spades, remain stage-worthy and musically sovereign; the ballet composer nonpareil whose Swan Lake, The Sleeping Beauty, and The Nutcracker seem wellnigh indestructible; the composer of songs which over time gained in technical sophistication and dramatic insights; and the orchestral composer who was best known in his own day not for his symphonies, cornerstones on which our contemporary repertory is built, but for his orchestral suites, works with charms that are abundant and accessible, but works now largely neglected. Yet despite his unquestioned mastery, Tchaikovsky was tormented throughout his life by the most severe selfdoubts, and never more than when writing his final three symphonies. Ironically, however, it was this lack of selfconfidence that became the scenario for what are inarguably his finest symphonic works. The causes of his torment are the stuff of speculation. Imperial Russia, no more than many more modern societies, dealt less than gracefully with alcoholism, with addiction to gambling, with homosexuality. Tchaikovsky’s homosexuality is an aspect of his persona with which he never made peace in the public arena, and, as the leading composer of his day, it was in the public arena where he lived his life. Indeed, his inability to comfortably accept his homosexuality is most often cited as having led to both his ill-conceived marriage and his alleged suicide.

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Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

 The history of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is inextricably linked to its founder, Sir Thomas Beecham, one of Britain’s greatest conductors and classical music’smore colourful figures. When in 1946 Beecham set out to create a world-class ensemble from the finest players in the country, he envisioned an orchestra that would bring the greatest music ever composed to every corner of the United Kingdom. Since Sir Thomas’ death in 1961, the Orchestra’s musical direction and development has been guided by a series of distinguished maestros including Rudolf Kempe, Antal Dorati, André Previn and Vladimir Ashkenazy. Today, under the inspired leadership and gifted musicianship of Daniele Gatti (Music Director since 1996), the Orchestra continues to expand its international reputation while maintaining a deep commitment to its self-appointed role as Britain’s national orchestra. 
The RPO’s performances and recordings receive rapturous acclaim from the public and the press around the world, which has praised the Orchestra for the “quality of its playing, which [is] incisive, insightful and extremely beautiful.” (The Guardian)
 Over the years, the RPO has enjoyed long-standing partnerships with important contemporary and living composers, and with the finest film composers of our time, from Brian Easdale’s score for The Red Shoes  (1948) to Maurice Jarre’s music for A Passage To India  (1984)—both of them Oscar® winners.

Daniele Gatti

Considered the ‘foremost conductor of his generation,’Italian conductor Daniele Gatti has galvanized the music world with his dramatic and instinctive style. A charismatic maestro, he demonstrates an equal mastery of the orchestra and the opera stage, delivering consistently probing inter-pretations imbued with fire and refined sensitivity.

Music Director of the Royal Phil-harmonic Orchestra since 1996, Gatti has inspired audiences and critics alike with his enraptured performances; his recordings have attracted enthusiastic notices. Since 1998, Gatti is also Music Director of Bologna’s opera house, the Teatro Comunale, and has conducted opera to great acclaim the world over. 
A native of Milan, Daniele Gatti studied piano and violin at the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory, earning his degree in composition and conducting. Following his La Scala début at the age of 27, he led productions at Venice’s Teatro La Fenice, the Chicago Lyric Opera, the Berlin Staats-oper and New York’s Metropolitan Opera. Maestro Gatti was Music Director of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome from 1992 to 1997 as well as Principal Guest Conductor of the Royal Opera

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Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 (2003)

Tchaikovsky

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Producer:Robina G. Young
Recording Engineer:Brad Michel
Recording location:Abbey Road Studio London England
Recording Software:Pyramix
Recording Type & Bit Rate:DSD64

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HMU907381: Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5
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Tracks
1.
Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 - Andante - Allegro con anima
Tchaikovsky
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2.
Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 - Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza - Moderato con anima
Tchaikovsky
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3.
Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 - Valse: Allegro moderato
Tchaikovsky
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4.
Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 - Finale: Andante maestoso - Allegro vivace - Molto vivace
Tchaikovsky
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