Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 4, Capriccio Italien, Op. 49 (2005)

Tchaikovsky

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Daniele Gatti

Whatever else its value – as an avenue for emotional catharsis, an ornament meant to please, an object that serves utilitarian ends – each piece of music is aural autobiography. Composers cannot escape the fact that their creations inevitably reflect their time and their training, their inspirations and insights. At the same time, it is impossible not to notice that in the works of Tchaikovsky, personality became paramount as never before. Not in his earliest works, perhaps, which were products of his conservatory tutelage in Moscow and St. Petersburg and resonate with innate gifts for melody and orchestration. But beginning in the mid-1870s, something changed. Personal struggles were made publicly manifest and inner conflicts found outward expression. Although the value of Tchaikovsky’s works – of the works, indeed, of any composer – resides ultimately in the musicitself, the exceptional nature of their creation demands attention. 
In the Fourth Symphony (1877-78), most notably, composition and confession are confounded. Tchaikovsky composed his prior three symphonies in situations that seem ordinary in comparison to the genesis of the Fourth. The First (called Winter Daydreams ) was the composer’s first major professional endeavor; it emerged with difficulty in 1866 and ’67, but was successfully premiered in 1868. (It would be revised in 1874.) The Second (the Little Russian, a nickname acquired after the composer’s death, in recognition of the Ukrainian folktunes it employs) was composed in 1872 and premiered in ’73; showing Tchaikovsky’s music at its most nationalistic, it was an immediate success (though in 1880 it, too, would be revised). And the Third (the Polish, so named, for the Tempo di polacca of its final movement) was warmly received at its 1875 first performance.

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Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

 The history of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra is inextricably linked to its founder, Sir Thomas Beecham, one of Britain’s greatest conductors and classical music’smore colourful figures. When in 1946 Beecham set out to create a world-class ensemble from the finest players in the country, he envisioned an orchestra that would bring the greatest music ever composed to every corner of the United Kingdom. Since Sir Thomas’ death in 1961, the Orchestra’s musical direction and development has been guided by a series of distinguished maestros including Rudolf Kempe, Antal Dorati, André Previn and Vladimir Ashkenazy. Today, under the inspired leadership and gifted musicianship of Daniele Gatti (Music Director since 1996), the Orchestra continues to expand its international reputation while maintaining a deep commitment to its self-appointed role as Britain’s national orchestra. 
The RPO’s performances and recordings receive rapturous acclaim from the public and the press around the world, which has praised the Orchestra for the “quality of its playing, which [is] incisive, insightful and extremely beautiful.” (The Guardian)
 Over the years, the RPO has enjoyed long-standing partnerships with important contemporary and living composers, and with the finest film composers of our time, from Brian Easdale’s score for The Red Shoes  (1948) to Maurice Jarre’s music for A Passage To India  (1984)—both of them Oscar® winners.

Daniele Gatti

Considered the ‘foremost conductor of his generation,’Italian conductor Daniele Gatti has galvanized the music world with his dramatic and instinctive style. A charismatic maestro, he demonstrates an equal mastery of the orchestra and the opera stage, delivering consistently probing inter-pretations imbued with fire and refined sensitivity.

Music Director of the Royal Phil-harmonic Orchestra since 1996, Gatti has inspired audiences and critics alike with his enraptured performances; his recordings have attracted enthusiastic notices. Since 1998, Gatti is also Music Director of Bologna’s opera house, the Teatro Comunale, and has conducted opera to great acclaim the world over. 
A native of Milan, Daniele Gatti studied piano and violin at the Giuseppe Verdi Conservatory, earning his degree in composition and conducting. Following his La Scala début at the age of 27, he led productions at Venice’s Teatro La Fenice, the Chicago Lyric Opera, the Berlin Staats-oper and New York’s Metropolitan Opera. Maestro Gatti was Music Director of the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia in Rome from 1992 to 1997 as well as Principal Guest Conductor of the Royal Opera

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Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 4, Capriccio Italien, Op. 49 (2005)

Tchaikovsky

Royal Philharmonic Orchestra

Producer: Robina G. Young
Recording Engineer: Brad Michel (DSD engineer - Chris Barrett)
Recording location: Walthamstow Assembly, London
Recording Software: Pyramix
Recording Type & Bit Rate: DSD64

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HMU907393: Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 4, Capriccio Italien, Op. 49
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Tracks.
1.
Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 - Andante sostenuto - Moderato con anima
Tchaikovsky
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2.
Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 - Andantino in modo di canzona
Tchaikovsky
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3.
Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 - Scherzo: Pizzicato ostinato - Allegro
Tchaikovsky
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4.
Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 - Finale: Allegro con fuoco
Tchaikovsky
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5.
Capriccio Italien, Op. 45 (1880)
Tchaikovsky
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